The Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases (SAJID), formerly called the Southern African Journal of Epidemiology and Infection (SAJEI), first appeared in 1985 as a joint publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of Southern Africa (IDSSA), the Sexually Transmitted Diseases Society of Southern Africa (STDSSA) and the Epidemiology Society of Southern Africa, the latter having subsequently been succeeded by the Public Health Association of South Africa (PHASA). Presently SAJID is published under the auspices of the Federation of Infectious Diseases Societies of South Africa which is an umbrella organisation incorporating IDSSA, STDSSA as well as the Infection Control Society of South Africa (ICASA), the National Antibiotic Study Forum (NASF) of South Africa, and the South African Society of Travel Medicine (SASTM).

Publications of SAJID centre round aspects of epidemiology and infection, particularly those of importance to the societies of FIDSSA. Topics around infection include clinical and epidemiological aspects of communicable diseases, laboratory diagnosis of infections, characterisation of infective agents by molecular techniques and the study of transmission patterns of pathogens in institutional and community settings. Other infection related studies cover surveillance of vaccine-controllable and other infectious diseases, drug susceptibility patterns of hospital-acquired and community-acquired pathogens and infection control strategies for the southern Africa region. SAJID also promotes greater collaboration between clinically oriented and laboratory-based divisions within the FIDSSA societies, and the establishment of quality assurance programmes and other measures to enhance and maintain standards of diagnostic and public health microbiology.

Scientific papers in the SAJID aim to advance the understanding of all aspects of epidemiology, public health, clinical microbiology and infection. The journal strives to promote research and exchange of information on specific areas of infectious diseases, medical microbiology and virology, covering fields of interest of the societies of FIDSSA and PHASA. Manuscripts describing research performed at southern African institutions and in southern African settings enjoy a high priority, as do health matters covering Africa and the developing world, as well as global issues such as malaria and other tropical diseases, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS. The scope of interest of SAJID is wide but the journal aims to maintain and improve the standard of its publications.

WE PUT THE ‘EX” IN ANDOLEX BECAUSE A SORE THROAT IS A THING OF THE PAST

The Andolex range and products are known to provide relief for patients suffering from a sore throat, mouth or gums.  These patients may suffer from sore throats due to viral or bacterial infections, mouth ulcers, oral conditions such as gingivitis or periodontitis or for relief of post-surgical procedures such as a tonsillectomy.

As the world runs out of cures, global consumption of antibiotics skyrockets, contributing to drug resistance

Despite the threat of a global health crisis in antibiotic resistance, worldwide use of antibiotics soared 39 percent between 2000 and 2015, fueled by dramatic increases in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).  

Dräger is celebrating the delivery of Primus number 50 000 to Far East Rand Hospital

Dräger is pleased to announce the production of the 50 000th Primus, even more thrilling to know is the fact that it is produced for Far East Rand Hospital in South Africa. The unit is referred to as the celebration device because, 50 000 is a mile stone for Dräger globally.

Clicks celebrates 500th pharmacy opening

South Africa’s largest retail pharmacy chain Clicks announced the opening of its 500th pharmacy at Clicks Park Station in Johannesburg.

Climate change: One of the greatest threats to public health in the 21st century

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), between 2030 and 2050, global climate change will result in 250 000 additional deaths per year from diseases like malnutrition, malaria, diarrhoea and heat stroke, placing increased stress on health resources and public health systems