The Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases (SAJID), formerly called the Southern African Journal of Epidemiology and Infection (SAJEI), first appeared in 1985 as a joint publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of Southern Africa (IDSSA), the Sexually Transmitted Diseases Society of Southern Africa (STDSSA) and the Epidemiology Society of Southern Africa, the latter having subsequently been succeeded by the Public Health Association of South Africa (PHASA). Presently SAJID is published under the auspices of the Federation of Infectious Diseases Societies of South Africa which is an umbrella organisation incorporating IDSSA, STDSSA as well as the Infection Control Society of South Africa (ICASA), the National Antibiotic Study Forum (NASF) of South Africa, and the South African Society of Travel Medicine (SASTM).

Publications of SAJID centre round aspects of epidemiology and infection, particularly those of importance to the societies of FIDSSA. Topics around infection include clinical and epidemiological aspects of communicable diseases, laboratory diagnosis of infections, characterisation of infective agents by molecular techniques and the study of transmission patterns of pathogens in institutional and community settings. Other infection related studies cover surveillance of vaccine-controllable and other infectious diseases, drug susceptibility patterns of hospital-acquired and community-acquired pathogens and infection control strategies for the southern Africa region. SAJID also promotes greater collaboration between clinically oriented and laboratory-based divisions within the FIDSSA societies, and the establishment of quality assurance programmes and other measures to enhance and maintain standards of diagnostic and public health microbiology.

Scientific papers in the SAJID aim to advance the understanding of all aspects of epidemiology, public health, clinical microbiology and infection. The journal strives to promote research and exchange of information on specific areas of infectious diseases, medical microbiology and virology, covering fields of interest of the societies of FIDSSA and PHASA. Manuscripts describing research performed at southern African institutions and in southern African settings enjoy a high priority, as do health matters covering Africa and the developing world, as well as global issues such as malaria and other tropical diseases, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS. The scope of interest of SAJID is wide but the journal aims to maintain and improve the standard of its publications.


NRF Health has added a convenient tube of buffered Vitamin C fizzy tablets with bioflavonoids, to their popular and affordable range of Vitamin C supplements.  Each handy pack contains 10 effervescent Vitamin C tablets which easily dissolve in a glass of water.


As South Africans, we love salting our food, but the more salt we consume, the more at risk it puts us of heart disease and stroke, which annually claims the lives of 78 475 people in our country.

Teen suicide prevention – communication the key to preventing teen suicide

 In an increasingly competitive world where adolescents are constantly under pressure to achieve and excel – at school, on the sports field, at home, among friends – it comes as no surprise that suicide is one of the leading causes of teen deaths, worldwide as well as in South Africa.

How non-communicable diseases (NCDs) can cause blindness.

In recent years, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have risen in prominence on the global public health agenda. NCDs are not passed from person to person but are typically the result of a combination of genetic, physiological, environmental and behavioural factors, and they tend to progress slowly. The most common NCDs include cardiovascular diseases (such as heart attacks and stroke), cancers, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes.


Bacterial Vaginosis, defined as an imbalance in vaginal flora characterised by low levels of lactobacilli and an increased frequency of facultatively anaerobic bacteria, is one of the most common reproductive tract infections in women globally.